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A dictionary of Teanu (Vanikoro, Solomon Islands)
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Mtp–Fr–Eng

Mtp–Eng–Fr

Mtp–Eng

Mtp–Fr

Tea–Eng–Fr

Tea–Eng

teanu dictionary
Index n
na
na1
na2
na3
nabe
nadikete
naka ruene
namolo
namuko
nanana
nara
nate
nati
nava
ne
nebe1
nebe2
nedemo
neido
neido kulevelu
nene
~nene1
~nene2
nengele
netebe
nga
ngabe
ngago
ngaiñe
ngaliko
ngamuli
nganae
ngapiaga
ngapiene
ngapwae
ngasune
ngaten' ae
ngatene
ngatene abia
~nge
ngele
ngilo
ngiro
ngogoro
ni
nidilo
nieti
no
nom'le
nomaA
nomaB
nomaC
noma
nomapu
nomianu
nomlemlesu
nomo
nomole
nom’ ole
none1
none2
nubuko
nubule
nuduro1
nuduro2
n’ adieA
n’ adieB
n’ adieC
na  [na] -.
na1   [na] ~ ne  dx.

(1) here.

(2) now.

na2   [na] noun, obligatorily possessed. place of ‹s.o., s.th.›. Often implies that the event is only virtually present in the location — whether it has ceased to take place, or has not begun yet.

(1) ⟨s.th.⟩  location of ‹s.th.›.

na moe 'none
the location of my house (past or future)

(2) ⟨house+⟩  remains, ruins.

Dapa li-romo na kulumoe iadapa Mouro.
They saw the remains of the Elves' village.

(2) ⟨s.o.⟩  place associated with ‹s.o.›, whether in a temporary or permanent way.

na ene pe ni-lebie
the place where I (usually) bathe

na ini pe i-te i-vongo
the place where he eats

(3) itinerary taken by ‹s.o.› in a past or future journey.

na3   [na] conj. shorter variant of nara* ‘Apprehensional’.
nabe  [naᵐbe] -.
nadikete  [naⁿdikete] -.
naka ruene  [naka ruene] noun. lit. “?? of door” : door latch, tradit. made of wood.

ruene

namolo  [namolo] -.
namuko  [namuko] -.
nanana  [nanana] -.
nara  [nara] -.
nate  [nate] -.
nati  [nati] -.
nava  [nava] noun, obligatorily possessed. what relation to ‹s.o.›? Question word standing for kin term.

Ini nava eo?
What is she to you? (e.g. your sister? cousin?)

[ POc *sapan. ]

ne  [ne] -.
nebe1   [neᵐbe] noun. <Fish> Lemon sole. Microstomus kitt.
nebe2   [neᵐbe] noun. <Bot> New Guinea Rosewood. Pterocarpus indicus.

Tepapa, li-toe kara nebe li-bo nga kulaña metele.
To make a stomping board, you cut a root of rosewood tree, and carve it in the shape of a semi-circle.
nedemo  [neⁿdemo] -.
neido  [neiⁿdo] -.
neido kulevelu  -. lit. “child of fowl” : chick.
nene  [nene] -.
~nene1   [(i·)nene] intransitive verb. shine.

Viko i-nene.
The treasure was shining.
~nene2   [(i·)nene] transitive verb. (vulg) suck.

U-ka u-nene ise ene!
nengele  [neŋele] noun. parts

(1) components, pieces, parts of a bigger whole.

nengele moe
the components (timbers) of a house

nengele kuo
the elements of a canoe

Kape le-toe langasuo peini, ka nengele wamitaka.
⟨canoe⟩ You cut out the big rail, and then the smaller pieces.

(2) ⟨body⟩  parts, limbs.

Ne-labu ebel' ini pe nengele i-meli.
I'll massage her body because some spots (on her body) are painful.

(3) accessories for ‹s.th.›.

nengele makone
[accessories of dance] the accessories necessary to carry out traditional dances (instruments, jumping boards+)
netebe  [neteᵐbe] ~ antebe  noun.

(1) marsh, swamp.

Vivilo li-teli ne netebe.
Swamp taros are planted in swamps.

(2) mud, muddy place.

Netebe pon, nara u-viane!
This is mud here, make sure you don't stumble!

loubo* antebe
[mud crab] k.o. crab
nga  [ŋa] -.
ngabe  [ŋaᵐbe] -.
ngago  [ŋaᵑgo] -.
ngaiñe  [ŋaiɲe] -.
ngaliko  [ŋaliko] -.
ngamuli  [ŋamuli] noun. ocean, open sea.

revo

Toñaki pine pe kape le-ke le-lui ne ngamuli tae.
It was not the kind of large ships that can go out into the ocean.
nganae  [ŋanae] -.
ngapiaga  [ŋapiaᵑga] -.
ngapiene  [ŋapiˈene] noun. <Ethn> dance festival. People feast for several days, and dance by stomping on boards (tepapa), laid out on the ground in a circle around a ritual pole (blateno). These dance festivals occur seldom nowadays; but they are central to many traditional stories.

li-vete ngapiene
announce the festival

Ngapiene ka i-sali pon ta — bwogo tili.
Then the festival comes to an end, after five days.
ngapwae  [ŋapʷae] -.
ngasune  [ŋasune] -.
ngaten' ae  -. lit. “what thing” : what?. Often contracted as nganae*.

ae [1]

Li-le pe ngaten' ae?
Why did they go? [lit. they went for what thing?]
ngatene  [ŋatene] noun. Poss: enaka thing.

(1) (concr) thing, object.

Uña ngaten' na, kape i-vio tev' eo.
All those things will be yours.

(2) (esp) s.o.'s belongings; luggage.

namolo

Uña ngaten' enaka i-wene tev' iu re.
My stuff (bags+) is up over there.

(3) (euph) piece of food.

none

Le-le le-labu* ngatene?
Shall we go grab something? (=food)

(4) (rare) animal; non-human creature.

Ngatene ponu, li-romo nga mwaliko, ia mwaliko tae.
⟨Spirits⟩ Those creatures look like they're human, but they are not.

Ka kaipa mwaliko na, ia kupa na ngatene nga na.
You people are human; but we are just non-human creatures [lit. just things] like this.

Dapa na ngatene nga tevie mwaliko, tevie nga li-romo nga tadoe.
These are special creatures, half man, half spirit.

(5) (abstr) thing; topic, issue, idea, meaning.

awa

Ngatene pon etapu tamwase.
This is a taboo issue.

Vesepiene iune, i-vete ngatene tilu.
⟨polysemy⟩ It is the same word, but with two distinct meanings. [lit. it says two things]

(6) effort, work. The combination of the verb ~la ‘take’ and ngatene ‘things’ results in the meaning ‘to work’.

~langatene

Awis pine peini ngatene pe a-la ponu.
Thank you for your efforts. [lit. for the things you took]

Ni-ovei ni-ko ngatene abia teve eo.
I know you have a lot of work. [lit. many things are with you]
ngatene abia  -. lit. “thing all” : everything.

abia

~nge  [(i·)ŋe] transitive verb. chew ‹sugarcane+› so as to suck out its juice while avoiding to eat the fibres.

Dameliko li-nge to.
The kids are chewing some sugarcane.

Lekele i-nge ua vede.
Flying-foxes chew fruits of pandanus.
ngele  [ŋele] -.
ngilo  [ŋilo] noun. <Fish> river eel. Anguilliformes spp.
ngiro  [ŋiro] -.
ngogoro  [ŋoᵑgoro] -.
ni  [ni] -.
nidilo  [niⁿdilo] -.
nieti  [nieti] -.
no  [no] -.
nom'le  [nom'le] -.
noma   [noma] noun, obligatorily possessed. <Anat>

(1) face.

tanoma ‘face, forehead’

viabasa ini ka noma ini ka mata ini
her hair, her face, her eyes

ni-aka noma
I'm washing my face.

(2) (gen) front part of ‹s.th.›.

noma toñaki
the prow of the ship

noma nuduro
the (front) ends of the fishing-scareline

(3) ⟨time period⟩  end of ‹s.th.›.

ne noma metele
at the end of the month
noma   noun. promontory, cape. Most cape names begin with the syllable Nom', from noma.

Li-da noma re li-ka.
They crossed the cape over there and came here.

Nomlemlesu noma pine.
Nomlemlesu is a major promontory.
noma   noun.

(1) ⦗spatial meaning⦘ in front.

(2) ⦗temporal meaning⦘ before this, previously.

Noma, viabas' ene i-ako.
My hair used to be blond.

(3) (esp) a long time ago, in the old days.

Noma li-katau ñe metele.
⟨calendar⟩ In the old days, people would just refer themselves to [lit. follow] the moon.
noma  [noma] -.
nomapu  [nomapu] noun. <Bot> k.o. tree. Securinega flexuosa.

[ POc *mapuqan. ]

nomianu  [nomianu] -.
nomlemlesu  [nomlemlesu] -.
nomo  [nomo] -.
nomole  [nomole] -.
nom’ ole  [nom’ ole] noun. lit. “front of sand” : sand beach.

ole

Laperusi vana i-moloe ne nom' ole take ne.
Lapérouse used to stroll around along that sand beach over there.
none1   [none] noun. <Bot> Potato yam. Dioscorea bulbifera.

uo ‘Greater yam’

Uo moloe na, samame none ka longo.
Here is some Red yam, together with Potato yam and Lesser yam.
none2   [none] noun. (gen) food. Etym.. Semantic extension of none1.
nubuko  [nuᵐbuko] -.
nubule  [nuᵐbule] noun. <Bot> whitewood (Euphorbiaceae). Endospermum medullosum.

nuduro1   [nuⁿduro] noun. <Zool> centipede. Chilopoda spp.
nuduro2   [nuⁿduro] voi. by analogy of shape with the centipede (nuduro1), designates various artefacts characterised by their length.

(1) long rope made of rattan stems (woworo) tied together, used as a scareline for fishing; “fishing rope”, “scareline”. Contrary to what is observed in other parts of the Pacific, this scareline does not include coconut palms or leaves.

Li-ngago woworo awoiu ka li-kila li-ko nuduro.
We tie together rattan stems, and call it a nuduro (scareline).

(2) palm of coconut or palmtree, displayed in some specific location to mark it as private or taboo; hence taboo, ban, prohibition to enter a place.

li-vi nuduro
set a taboo leaf

Gi' one i-la nuduro i-vio ne sekele / moe / moko… (ñe uie luro).
My uncle put up a taboo in his garden / in his house / on the reef… (using a coconut palm).

Dapa li-woi nuduro ne touro, me i-botongo temaka.
They put up taboo signs on the seashore, to protect the area (from poachers).

Mwalik' iote i-ka i-vokoiu nuduro.
Someone came and tore out the taboo (leaf).

(3) (fig) proscription, taboo, whether legal or moral.

i-sube ñe nuduro
[make a mistake on a taboo] infringe a moral taboo; do wrong, intentionally or not

i-bei nuduro
[trample on a taboo] deliberately infringe a proscription
n’ adie   [naⁿdie] ~ ne adie  -. ⦗spatial⦘ lit. “in the back of” : beyond, on the other side of ‹a place›.

n' adie kulumoe
on the other side of the village

n' adie ngamuli
beyond the ocean

ne Adie Vono
⟨placename⟩ on the rear side of the island
n’ adie   adv. ⦗temporal⦘ afterwards, then. Synt.. Typically expressed as a sentential topic.

Syn: awoiu

Nga mwaliko i-bu, dapa le-le le-iu ebele ini. N' adie, dapa abia ne kulumoe kape le-bei bete.
When somebody dies, people bury their body. Afterwards, everyone in the village will hold a funeral ceremony.
n’ adie   conj. ⦗foll. by clause⦘ after, once (an event takes place).

Ne adie le-lebie awoiu, kape ne-re pele.
Once we've had a swim, I'll go netfishing.
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